The Dutch health insurance system is complex. Since a change in legislation in early 2014 there are two main routes in which healthcare insurance may cover the cost of psychotherapy. Some therapist are so-called ‘contracted’ therapists as they have entered into legal agreements with insurers, and they invoice the client’s insurance directly. Other therapists have chosen not to do so. In that case clients will still be reimbursed to some degree by their healthcare insurer through reimbursement (so-called ‘restitutie’). There is a nationally agreed minimum level of reimbursement per year, but each insurer and package has their own different criteria for reimbursement above that level. Like many other therapists I have decided not to enter into contracts with insurers. We took this step due to the way Dutch insurance companies have increasingly been interfering with the manner in which they feel therapists are supposed to do their work. In our view this has everything to do with their in itself respectable wish to control healthcare spending. However, BIG-registered therapists in the Netherlands have gone through a long and thorough training, are required to engage in ongoing professional development, and are subject to stringent quality control by their professional societies and the government (see the ‘links’ section). Our experience has been that directly contracting with insurers results in unnecessary and detrimental interference in the therapeutic work, as well as administrative requirements that breach confidentiality. We believe that not contracting with insurers safeguards the quality of the work and guarantees absolute confidentiality. Prospective clients should therefore check to what level their insurance package allows for reimbursement for psychotherapy expenses they make (through the so-called ‘restitution’ option). By Dutch law all insurance companies are required to offer some degree of reimbursement provided you have been referred by your GP. A formal insurance invoice is provided at the end of treatment (or after 12 months, whichever comes first), which you may then use to claim back the expenses from your healthcare insurance. The monthly invoice is not suitable for insurance purposes. Clients are personally responsible for payment.

Please note that the insurance only covers the insured amount, and sessions exceeding the insured amount will still be payable by the client. This is also the case for therapeutic work focusing on areas that are deemed to fall outside of your insurance package (OZP in insurance terms). For my BIG registration numbers see the “about me” page. The insurance code (the so-called ‘AGB-code’) for the practise is 94-056835, and my own personal AGB-code is 94-007814.

Practise hours

Wednesday: 9.30-12.30, Thursday: 18.00-21.30, Friday: 13.30-21.30


Sessions cancelled at least 12 hours in advance will not be charged.


I aim to have satisfied clients, but clients who wish to reflect on any differences we might have are invited to do so, either with myself or a neutral colleague: Mrs. M.Ruijter. Please note that I am also bound by formal standards of care from my professional societies, and these are available for either complaints or mediation. See: NIP